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Lost & Found Teasures of the Heifetz Legacy – Vol II

Volume 2Live performance at Ambassador Auditorium with Pianist Brooks Smith, previously unrecorded Badings "Capriccio" for violin and electronic tape, and added treat of unrecorded JH transcriptions with Mark Westcott at the piano. Performed on the Heifetz-Tononi violin.

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Lost & Found Treasures of the Heifetz Legacy – Vol I

Volume 120 transcriptions of Jascha Heifetz which he never recorded. Performed on the Heifetz-Tononi violin.

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Forgotten Gems from the Heifetz Legacy

Forgotten Gems24 little "itsy-bitsies" personally brought to Ms. Kloss's attention by her teacher saying, "This is a good one for you!"

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Reviews and Testimonials

"This is volume II of Sherry Kloss's "Lost and Found Treasures of the Heifetz Legacy", with the subtitle, 'The Heifetz-Tononi Sings Again'. These very exciting readings of the Beethoven and Strauss Sonatas come from a concert that Kloss played in the 1980's with Jascha Heifetz's long-time accompanist Brooks Smith. The instrument she is playing was a gift from Heifetz, who knew that his legacy would be sure to stay alive in her hands.  These readings make it clear that Heifetz was right, and it is indeed fortunate that Kloss has dedicated the larger part of her career to preserving the Heifetz legacy.

In addition to the Beethoven and Strauss, the concert included a reading of the "Capriccio" for violin and electronic tape, a piece that was written in 1952 by Henk Badings and was published in 1959. It is a piece that Heifetz would probably not have been interested in playing, but is a piece of great historic interest because it is one of the earliest pieces written for live solo instrument and pre-recorded electronic tape. The electronic tape part of the piece is made of two sound tracks (to take the development of stereo into account) that were then combined into one electronic tape sound track. The sounds on the tape portion of the piece are generated form 12 oscillators, which included a sine tone generator and a noise generator. They were the only sound sources available at the time.

While the 21st century allows for complicated computer generation and manipulation of sound waves, the electronic music composers who were working during middle of the 20th century built their sound waves from scratch (sometimes literally) by relatively primitive means, splicing and taping together miles of magnetic tape, and doing a lot of math. The violin part is a kind of obbligato to the electronic "accompaniment", and the interaction between the natural and synthetic sounds is quite remarkable.

THIS IS THE ONLY RECORDING OF THE WORK CURRENTLY AVAILABLE, SO IT SHOULD BE OF GREAT IMPORTANCE TO PEOPLE INTERESTED IN ELECTRONIC MUSIC, ESPECIALLY BECAUSE OF THE HIGH QUALITY OF THE PERFORMANCE.

The CD also included three more recent recordings of some of Heifetz's many transcriptions played with great sensitivity by Kloss and her more recent pianist partner Mark Westcott. The Rachmaninoff is a transcription of the Piano Prelude Opus 32, No. 5, the Haydn comes from the String Quartet Opus 54, No. 2, and the Wieniawski is a an arrangement of the fifth caprice from his Opus 18.

AMERICAN RECORD GUIDE by Fine
http://www.americanrecordguide.com/


. . . I enjoyed Sherry Kloss' renditions of Heifetz' transcriptions, which she provides on her two compact discs: "Lost and Found Treasures of the Heifetz Legacy" and "Forgotten Gems from the Heifetz Legacy." The book and the two compact discs should be in the library of every violin enthusiast. – Carl B. Salzinger, Mayfield Heights, OH


A VIOLINIST BROUGHT TO LIFE BY HIS STUDENTS
. . . Most revealing, is the effect he (Jascha Heifetz) had on others.

"When everyone had entered the classroom, we all sat nervously waiting for his first words, which generally would be, "Who's ready?" says one former student, Sherry Kloss. "I almost passed out when I heard those two words. Who's ready? How could anyone ever be ready to play for Jascha Heifetz?" — The New York Times, Neil Genzlinger, reviewer of movie "God's Fiddler" (November 10, 2011).


The Jascha Heifetz Society has brought out a 4-DVD package titled "2000–2001 Concert Series featuring violin luminaries Sherry Kloss and Erick Friedman (both Heifetz pupils and assistants) together with Ruggiero Ricci."

The live recitals from each of these stunning players features a wide range of repertoire from Bach to Ernst. Now in their eighties and nineties, Rosand and Ricci more than hold their own with the two younger players. This is a veritable feast of fiddling and a magnificently filmed tribute to the greatest them all, Heifetz. — Stringendo (Reviews editor, Journal of the Australian Strings Association, April 2012.

Sherry In Concert
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Sherry with Student
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Sherry with Students
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Sherry Plaing Violin
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